Release Date: April 25, 2009

These Walls: The Boldt Co. building in Oklahoma City

The Journal Record

When the Boldt Co. built its southern operations office in Oklahoma City, it wanted that building to be green.

While there is nary a touch of the color green on the facade, the environmentally conscious elements in design are evident throughout the structure of the Boldt Co. building at 101 W. Hefner Rd.

The building opened in 2005 and in 2007 received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design silver certification. It was the first privately owned building in the state to take that honor.

But the process of LEED certification took much work and planning.

Boldt, based in Appleton, Wis., has been in Oklahoma City since the 1980s, but in leased space.

About five years ago Tom Boldt, CEO of the company, began plans for a new building in Oklahoma City.

"In the beginning Tom Boldt was very adamant about this building being green," said Sam Johnson, Boldt's chief estimator for southern operations. "He's one of the front-runners in the industry for building green projects."

The building sits along the west side of Broadway Extension with large windows looking to the east.

On the north end of the building is a 20,000-square-foot warehouse. That area slopes downward to a wall of windows and concludes on the south with red stone. The office space accounts for 22,000 square feet.

Light fixtures are few in the lobby, where natural light spills in during the day and colored LED lights illuminate the exterior at night.

Offices in the building have lights that turn on when anyone enters a room and turn off after three minutes of no activity in the space.

From top to bottom, the building is made of recycled and locally sourced materials.

The Low E glass cuts glare and heat transfer. Outside much of the office space, shades made of wood planks allow light in but cut down on heat from direct sunlight.

The use of recycled and environmentally friendly building materials also contributed to LEED points. Additional points were earned for things like bike racks and recycling bins in and around the building.

"Our initial goal was to get the silver certification," Johnson said.

LEED requirements also require that at least 75 percent of employees have a natural light source. Employees can see outdoors from almost any point in the office space.

An inconspicuous supply room is actually a safe room designed to protect employees from a tornado.

Johnson designed the Boldt Builds sign on the exterior, where the word 'Builds' is off the building, supported by metal beams. When the morning sunlight hits the building, it casts a shadow of the word on the north wall.

As the facade of the building changes from windows to red stone walls, the company incorporated glass to represent older buildings in Oklahoma and the company's vision for the future.

"We've got some of that glass that looks like it's jutting through," Johnson said. "It kind of takes the future through the past."